Caring For Your Giclee Prints

Giclee prints are very special: they can be found in the world's finest museums, art galleries and private art collections and should be treasured and cared for in the same way as an original piece of art.

Giclee prints carefully reproduce the rich colours and beautiful detail of each brush stroke of the original painting and any imperfections that you may see on the print are a feature of the original painting and exact reflection of the nature of the painted surfaces of paintings.

 

Fine Art Paper Prints

 

Your giclee print has been created on beautiful 320 gsm museum grade French cold press 100% cotton rag paper using fully archival Epson UltraChromeK3® pigment inks.

All paper prints have a spray coat of UV inhibiting varnish which is designed to add an extra level of protection to the ink on the paper. This coating also increases the longevity of the colours in your image. 

Please read the care instructions below to ensure your giclee print will continue to enhance your surroundings and bring you pleasure for years to come.

 

Care and handling of your paper giclee print on arrival 

 

  • I recommend taking your print straight to the framer, unrolled. If this can’t be done, after unrolling it from the packaging, please use two hands to support your print so it will not bend. A crease in the print is permanent.
  • The cardboard tube your print is packaged in is not suitable for long-time storage as it is not acid free and archival. 
  • Please keep your new print covered until it is framed to avoid damage. Be careful of water, hard objects & adhesives as these can damage and scratch the surface of your print. Try not to use your hands to wipe off any dust as this can also scratch the surface.
  • After being framed, try to keep your print away from direct sunlight as UV rays can eventually affect the colours over time.

 

Canvas Prints

 

Your Giclee print has been professionally printed on artist’s quality, heavy duty canvas with fully archival Epson UltraChromeK3® pigment inks.

All canvas prints have a coat of UV inhibiting varnish which is designed to add an extra level of protection to the ink on the canvas. This coating also increases the longevity of the colours in your image. 

Please read the care instructions below to ensure your giclee print will continue to enhance your surroundings and bring you pleasure for years to come.

 

Care and handling of your canvas giclee print on arrival

 

  • The very nature of a natural product such as cotton canvas means that there will be imperfections (lumps and bumps) on the surface of the canvas caused by the variations in the cotton threads that make up the canvas. This is normal and a feature of cotton canvas.
  • Likewise, any imperfections that you may see on the print are a feature of the original painting and as such a reflection of the nature of the painted surfaces of original paintings.
  • After unrolling the print from the packaging, please use two hands to support the print so it will not bend. A crease in the print is permanent. Even better, take you print directly to the framer still in its packaging rather than handle it yourself.
  • The cardboard tube your art print is packaged in is not suitable for long-time storage as it is not acid free and archival. However, your print is safe while wrapped in the special tissue paper I have provided.
  • Please keep your new print covered until it is stretched and framed to avoid damage. Be careful of water, hard objects & adhesives as these can damage or scratch the surface of the print. Try not to use your hands to wipe off any dust as this can also scratch the surface.
  • Try not to display your canvas prints in areas of high concentrations of UV light or heat. Use correct coloured art lighting (if possible) for best results.
  • Canvas prints can be cleaned with a light feather duster. Solvents etc. should never be used. If anything marks your canvas or stains it, seek expert advice such as a fine art print framer.

 

Taking your canvas giclee print to the framer 

 

In addition to the actual image size, I include a generous amount of white border of 2.5" each side (5" extra inches overall) on the canvas print to wrap around the widest of stretcher frames. This process is called ‘gallery wrapping’ where the canvas is wrapped around the sides and back of the frame and the staples are placed out of sight on the back so there is no need for further framing.

There are different thicknesses of stretcher bars (the wooden frame your canvas is wrapped around). I normally stretch my original paintings on deep 1 ½” wooden frames as I personally prefer the look of the painting against the wall with that width. Please ask your chosen picture framer to show you some examples of different widths to help you decide which look you would prefer.

The quality of the wood used for the gallery wrap is important to the overall look and longevity of your canvas print. A good framer should be able to tell you the type of wood they will use for stretching.

It is best to avoid Fir or Paulownia wood as they are cheaper woods usually imported from Asia. They can bend, crack or warp over time and eventually ruin the look of your painting. In Australia, artists mostly use Pine for stretcher bars and in the USA, Pine, Tulipwood and American Poplar are considered the best choice.

Either single or double stapling on the BACK of the canvas is considered good practice (never on the sides!) and your framer should apply heavy duty D rings and gallery wire for hanging the canvas.

 

 

If you would like some further advice or have any questions I’m always happy to hear from you!